Brit survivor of New Zealand mosque massacre cradled dead child during attack

The British survivor of the New Zealand mosque massacre has relived the horrific moment he cradled a dead child in his arms and told the killer: “I will never forgive you.”

Nathan Smith was at one of two Christchurch mosques targeted by white supremacist Brenton Tarrant when he went on the rampage and slaughtered 51 people.

The brave dad-of-three looked the race hate monster straight in the eye and said: ”I held a three-year-old boy in my arms praying he was still alive. But he was not. You took him away.”

Mr Smith, one of several survivors to speak at a sentencing hearing at the High Court, said: “You killed in my name. I’m white, Muslim and proud.

“All you have done is cause great shame for Europeans.”

Twisted Tarrant actually smirked when Mr Smith suggested he read the Muslims’ holy book.

The Brit, who moved to New Zealand from Dorset in 2005, told the killer: “If you have a few spare minutes – and you will have many – you may want to read the Koran, it’s beautiful.”

Sick Tarrant filmed his first shooting at the Al Noor mosque in March last year and live streamed it on Facebook.

One of the youngest to die was Mucad Ibrahim, aged three. Mr Smith saw the killer gunning down fellow worshippers before he escaped through a fire exit.

He said: “You have changed my life for ever and I will never forgive you.”

But he added: “Because of you my faith is stronger….I have nothing else to say to you, but you will be judged.”

Farisha Razak, whose father Ashraf Ali died in the atrocity, told Tarrant he had accomplished nothing except to unite people against him.

She said: “Nobody wants you, buddy. You’re rejected by your country, your parents and your friends. You’re a loser and don’t deserve to see the light of day,”

Tarrant, 29, pleaded guilty to 51 counts of murder, 40 attempted murders and one charge of terrorism. He will be sentenced later this week and is expected to be the first person in New Zealand to receive life without possibility of parole.